Gardening for butterflies and bees

Really enjoying Jan Miller-Klein’s book, Gardening for Butterflies, Bees and other beneficial insects.  It’s got loads of fantastic colour photos of plants and the pollinators they attract and the large format makes it so easy to use.  It shows you what flowers to plant for spring, summer and autumn pollen and nectar and includes a combination of British wild flowers, garden plants and shrubs.  Now I know which hebes to plant – “midsumer beauty” and “great orme” were found to be the most attractive to butterflies.  So as you can see, it’s not just honeybees I am planting food for in my garden.

Honeybees have opened up a whole new world of wildlife. In addition to the bumblebees ( I must plant Vipers bugloss for them) and solitary bees (knapweeds and stachys for some of them) , this spring and summer I’m going to try to make the garden more butterfly-friendly as well.  They loved the verbena bonariensis and the Erysium Bowles Mauve wall flower I planted last year.

I didn’t know that the larvae of many butterflies only feed on one specific plant so for example the larvae of the Common blue butterfly needs Birds-foot Trefoil, the wild, yellow pea flower that’s in bloom in June/July. It also provides food for adults and what’s more it has a higher pollen content than many other flowers so it’s also important for bumblebees. And the same goes for Red clover – it’s pollen has a high protein content.

Jan gave a talk a few weeks ago at a local gardening club I’ve joined. I bought some wild flower seeds from her – Red campion, Ragged robin, Feverfew, Wild garlic mustard, Evening primrose (good for moths) and Eupatorium (from her national collection featured on Gardeners World last year).

I plan to start sowing them all in trays this weekend while the sun shines.

 

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